How Cloud Computing Can Protect Companies from Coronavirus

How Cloud Computing Can Protect Companies from Coronavirus

We’re living in a strange time. The recent coronavirus outbreak (or COVID-19, if you want to be more accurate) is changing the way people live their daily lives and interact with each other. It’s also impacting how businesses operate, as employees request to work from home and the state of supply chains fluctuates unpredictably. With the world as it is, how can your company continue to run successfully? One technology that shouldn’t be overlooked during the coronavirus outbreak is cloud computing.

For years, the cloud has provided businesses with the resources necessary to remotely process large amounts of data, build and run mission-critical applications and services, and collaborate with partners across the globe. Now that companies have to confront the realities of coronavirus and its business impact, users should turn to cloud computing to mitigate the effects that the pandemic will undoubtedly bring. Below, we’ve listed the ways that companies can use cloud computing to shield themselves from the damage coronavirus will cause.

Looking for more info on cloud solutions and how your business can use them effectively during this crisis? Our free Cloud Managed Service Providers Buyer’s Guide contains profiles on the top cloud managed service providers for AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud, as well as questions you should ask vendors and yourself before buying. We also offer an MSP Vendor Map that outlines those vendors in a Venn diagram to make it easy for you to select potential providers.

Enabling remote work for employees

One of the primary issues with coronavirus in the workforce is ensuring that employees are safe — and that requires that they keep their distance from each other. Allowing employees to work from home is a smart (and sometimes legally required) move when combating the spread of the virus. How do you keep your business running properly when employees can’t come into the office? Cloud-based solutions can usually be accessed from anywhere in the world; all an employee needs is a device to access the tool’s portal. This means that all a worker has to do to use cloud solutions from home is access to the Internet and/or any required software.

Offloading resource management

When employees are working from home, they likely aren’t able to access in-office resources (unless your company allows remote user access to company servers). Because of this, businesses need a way to give workers the resources they need to run corporate applications and services. With cloud solutions, this is already taken care of. Cloud servers host mission-critical apps without putting a strain on local resources, which also relieves the stress of storage space on user devices. This is also useful for voice and video communications — critical tools for maintaining communication outside of the office, but also tools that can put a large strain on resources.

Our MSP Buyer’s Guide contains profiles on the top cloud managed service providers for AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud, as well as questions you should ask vendors and yourself before buying. We also offer an MSP Vendor Map that outlines those vendors in a Venn diagram to make it easy for you to select potential providers.

Using online collaboration tools

While they’re not working in the office, employees still need a way to collaborate with each other on projects. Cloud-based development solutions allow users to work on the same resources even when they aren’t in the same physical location. At the most basic level, a company should have a communication tool so employees can talk to each other in real-time. More advanced solutions allow users to collaborate on documents and projects from anywhere, and are worth deploying if your company doesn’t use them already.

Operating online stores during peak times

For a specific example, retail stores are already feeling a massive strain on their infrastructure thanks to the coronavirus. Plenty of customers will initially stock up on food, but after this period, those same customers will stay at home — but may still require materials. They’ll turn to online stores to get the stuff they need, and when a huge chunk of the population is doing this at once, you need to ensure your website will be able to handle the stress. If your website is cloud-based, it can take on more or less server space as need be, scaling up during peak times; this means that your customers will continue to be happy as they transition away from in-store shopping.


Looking for a managed service provider for your cloud solutions? Our MSP Buyer’s Guide contains profiles on the top cloud managed service providers for AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud, as well as questions you should ask vendors and yourself before buying. We also offer an MSP Vendor Map that outlines those vendors in a Venn diagram to make it easy for you to select potential providers.

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Daniel Hein

Dan is a tech writer who writes about Enterprise Cloud Strategy and Network Monitoring for Solutions Review. He graduated from Fitchburg State University with a Bachelor's in Professional Writing. You can reach him at dhein@solutionsreview.com
Daniel Hein