Comparing the Cloud: Put the Top Ten PaaS Vendors Head-to-Head for a Full-Stack Comparison

Comparing The Cloud

 

Over the past decade, enterprise IT has experienced an unprecedented growth in data and mobility that has left legacy on-premise solutions struggling to keep up.

Many have turned to cloud computing as the solution to the modern enterprises’ need for a flexible and scalable IT environment, and now, for the first time ever, cloud solutions are set to surpass on-premise solutions in overall enterprise IT spending.

As cloud usage grows and enterprises move beyond typical infrastructure and software as a service use cases, the platform as a service (PaaS) model of cloud computing has emerged as a major component of the modern hybrid IT environment. PaaS

However, the PaaS landscape is evolving in real time—finding and deploying the right solutions can be a daunting challenge.

Choosing a PaaS Solutions Starts With Your Developers

At Solutions Review, we believe that the best approach to choosing a PaaS solution is to start with the people who will be using it: developers.

But not all developers are the same, Some developers prefer graphical tools; others prefer to perfect their application with coding. Some Developers want fast delivery capabilities; others want deep configuration and fine-tuning possibilities. Most importantly, developers want to know that a given solutions will support the software stack of their choice, and that criteria should be front-of-mind in any PaaS evaluation process.

With that in mind, we’ve created the PaaS Buyer’s Matrix Report to provide potential PaaS buyers with an easy tool for comparing the top 10 best-of-breed PaaS solutions across the five criteria that matter most to developers:

Final Cloud Infographic

Features: Public or private hosting, open source, method of isolation (containers or virtual machines), number of US and international data regions, pricing options, and whether or not a free option is available.

Languages: The runtimes than an application can be written in.

Middleware: Any software component or library which assists with, but is not directly involved in a task. Essentially, middleware is any software that acts as a liason. For our purposes, this means web servers such as Nginx and Jboss, and load balancers such as HAproxy.

Frameworks: Software frameworks designed to support the development of websites, web applications, web services and resources. This section includes content management PHP-based applications such as Drupal, as well as Java-based frameworks like Grails, and Python-based frameworks like Flask and Django.

Services: Core native services that are provided by the PaaS vendor as a part of the offering. This includes mem caching services, document-oriented database services, and big data services such as Apache Hadoop.

The 2015 Buyer’s Matrix for PaaS Cloud Solutions evaluates the following PaaS providers: Amazon Elastic Beanstalk, Microsoft Azure, Centurylink Appfog, Cloudcontrol dotCloud, EngineYard, Google App Engine, IBM Bluemix, Pivotal Cloud Foundry, Redhat Openshift, and Salesforce Heroku.

Follow the link below to view a free, full-length copy of the 2015 PaaS Comparison Matrix.

 

 

Jeff Edwards
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Jeff Edwards

Editor at Solutions Review
Jeff Edwards is an enterprise technology writer and analyst covering Identity Management, SIEM, Endpoint Protection, and Cybersecurity writ large.He holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Journalism from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and previously worked as a reporter covering Boston City Hall.
Jeff Edwards
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