A Permanent Stat of Cyber War? Venafi Survey Explores

A Permanent Stat of Cyber War? Venafi Survey Explores

Venafi today released the results of its survey “Are We In a Permanent State of Cyber War?” The survey reached 485 IT security professionals at the RSA Conference 2020, asking their opinions on the current state of cyber warfare. Also, the poll asked security professionals about the most vulnerable asset in a cyber war. 

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Venafi positions itself as a cybersecurity encryption provider. It provides cryptographic keys and digital certificates to deliver machine-to-machine connections and communications. Additionally, Venafi provides machine identity protection and orchestration platforms. The Venafi TrustAuthority product uses continuous discovery and monitoring to ensure machine identity and global visibility. Meanwhile, The Venafi TrustNet accelerates security risk intelligence on rogue certificates. 

According to the survey, 88 percent of security professionals say the world is in a permanent state of cyber war. Unsurprisingly, 90 percent expressed concern about the risk for digital infrastructure as a result, as it could suffer the most damage. Additionally, 60 percent of security professionals say power, water, healthcare, and transportation remain equally vulnerable to a cyberattack that causes physical damage. 

Kevin Bocek, Vice President of Security Strategy and Threat Intelligence at Venafi shared some of his thoughts in a blog post. “The sophisticated cyberattacks that are the hallmark of nation-state attacks often target digital keys and certificates that serve as machine identities. These critical security assets are often poorly protected and provide attackers with the ability to hide in encrypted traffic, pivot across networks and eavesdrop on sensitive data.” 

“Any organization that isn’t protecting machine identities at least as well as they protect usernames and password is at greater risk of becoming a victim of a cyberattack. And, unfortunately, these risks are unlikely to change in the near term because most organizations are just beginning to understand these risks.”

Learn more about Venafi here

  

Ben Canner

Ben Canner is an enterprise technology writer and analyst covering Identity Management, SIEM, Endpoint Protection, and Cybersecurity writ large. He holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English from Clark University in Worcester, MA. He previously worked as a corporate blogger and ghost writer. You can reach him via Twitter and LinkedIn.
Ben Canner